Oct/17 - 18, 2020 Asakusa Sanja Festival

Sightseeing information about Oct/17 - 18, 2020 Asakusa Sanja Festival in Japan.


Oct/17 - 18, 2020 Asakusa Sanja Festival4.6

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 from 10/17 '20 to 10/18 '20

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※Due to the coronavirus concerns, the dates of Sanja Festival has been postponed from May 15-17 to October 17-18th.
And Mikoshi Procession is cancled.
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Asakusa Sanja Festival is one of the three great Shinto festivals in Tokyo along with Kanda and Sanno festivals.

Day 1: Daigyoretsu Parade
On the first day, there will be the grand parade(Daigyoretsu Parade), people wearing historical outfits are walking throughout the Asakusa town.
The must-see event is Binzasara Mai. This is a traditional ritual dance, the men walking with their Binzasara (musical instrument made with many thin pieces of wood) to pray for good harvest.

Day 2: Local Mikoshi Procession
About 100 portable shrines(mikoshi) from 44 local towns gather at the backyard of the Sensoji Temple and are given purification at Asakusa Shrine, then leave for each town one by one.

Day 3: Three Sacred Mikoshi Procession
This is the climax of the festival. Three sacred Mikoshi come out of the Asakusa Shrine around 6 in the morning and travel through local towns throughout a day. Three Mikoshi groups are very competitive as they jostle to carry their mikoshi. Also, the ritual dance and music along with some other events are held in and around the Asakusa Shrine until three Mikoshi come back to the shrine.

Dates: October 17 - 18, 2020
Venue: Asakusa Shrine, Sensouji Temple
Access: Asakusa Station

PurposeFestivals,should go,easily accessible,parade,that you'll never forget,Traditional folk,men,shrine/temple,sightseeing,major
Airport/Sta.Asakusa Sta. (about 500m) Google Transit

Reviews

5.03 weeks ago

Worth to visit there especially at night !!!!
Instagram: momo_jp_uk_cr

5.03 weeks ago

Go there at night ! Sooo nice

5.03 weeks ago

Nice place and there are a lot of traditional souvenirs

5.0in the last week

Sensō-ji (金龍山浅草寺, Kinryū-zan Sensō-ji) is an ancient Buddhist temple located in Asakusa, Tokyo, Japan. It is Tokyo's oldest temple, and one of its most significant. Formerly associated with the Tendai sect of Buddhism, it became independent after World War II. Adjacent to the temple is a five-story pagoda, the Asakusa Shinto shrine, as well as many shops with traditional goods in the Nakamise-dōri.

The Sensoji Kannon temple is dedicated to Kannon Bosatsu, the Bodhisattva of compassion, and is the most widely visited spiritual site in the world with over 30 million visitors annually.

The temple has a titanium tiled roof that maintains the historic image but is stronger and lighter.

History
The temple is dedicated to the bodhisattva Kannon (Avalokiteśvara). According to legend, a statue of the Kannon was found in the Sumida River in 628 B.C. by two fishermen, the brothers Hinokuma Hamanari and Hinokuma Takenari. The chief of their village, Hajino Nakamoto, recognized the sanctity of the statue and enshrined it by remodeling his own house into a small temple in Asakusa so that the villagers could worship Kannon.

The first temple was founded in 645 AD, which makes it the oldest temple in Tokyo. In the early years of the Tokugawa shogunate, Tokugawa Ieyasu designated Sensō-ji as tutelary temple of the Tokugawa clan.

The Nishinomiya Inari shrine is located within the precincts of Sensō-ji and a torii identifies the entry into the hallowed ground of the shrine. A bronze plaque on the gateway structure lists those who contributed to the construction of the torii, which was erected in 1727 (Kyōhō 12, 11th month).

During World War II, the temple was bombed and destroyed during the 10 March air raid on Tokyo. It was rebuilt later and is a symbol of rebirth and peace to the Japanese people. In the courtyard there is a tree that was hit by a bomb in the air raids, and it had regrown in the husk of the old tree and is a similar symbol to the temple itself.

Temple grounds

The temple ground of Sensō-ji
Sensō-ji is the focus of Tokyo's largest and most popular festival, Sanja Matsuri. This takes place over 3–4 days in late spring, and sees the surrounding streets closed to traffic from dawn until late evening.

Dominating the entrance to the temple is the Kaminarimon or "Thunder Gate". This imposing Buddhist structure features a massive paper lantern dramatically painted in vivid red-and-black tones to suggest thunderclouds and lightning. Beyond the Kaminarimon is Nakamise-dori with its shops, followed by the Hōzōmon or "Treasure House Gate" which provides the entrance to the inner complex. Within the precincts stand a stately five-story pagoda and the main hall, devoted to Kannon.

The Nakamise-dōri (仲見世通り) is a street on the approach to the temple. It is said to have come about in the early 18th century, when neighbors of Sensō-ji were granted permission to set up shops on the approach to the temple. However, in May 1885 the government of Tokyo ordered all shop owners to leave. In December of that same year the area was reconstructed in Western-style brick. During the 1923 Great Kantō earthquake many of the shops were destroyed, then rebuilt in 1925 using concrete, only to be destroyed again during the bombings of World War II.

The length of the street is approximately 250 meters and contains around 89 shops.

Excerpt from Wikipedia

5.0in the last week

One the most iconic places in tokyo, usually really crowded, but COVID-19 allowed me to take nice pictures by night. Prefer coming there before 4pm if you want to do some shopping